Missingpet911.com is a website promoting the reunification of missing pets with their families. We are dedicated to vigorously promoting and educating the community about the importance of a central database of lost and found pets. Our initial focus is Fairfield County, CT.

This is a free web resource! You can notify your local Fairfield County community of a lost pet using unique software modeled after real estate websites.

Other Resources/Websites to Report Your Missing Pet

How Does missingpet911.com Work?

This site helps find your missing pet by not only posting information (including a picture) of your pet on our website, but generating an email alert that is immediately sent out to all animal shelter/rescue groups and veterinarians in Fairfield County. Learn more …

How Can I Help?

You can help this site realize its goal of reuniting lost pets with their owners by registering to receive email alerts, and by encouraging others in your community to register with missingpet911.com as well. Learn more …

More Ways To Be A Hero

Rescue groups are always in need of the following:

Food, Food, Food- Laundry detergent, Bleach, Dryer Sheets, Paper Towels, Garbage Bags, Hand Sanitizers, Rubber Gloves, Clean Ladies Socks, Uncooked Plain Rice, Plastic & Rubber Storage Bins, Pet Toys, Outdoor Pet Shelters (Plastic picnic cooler chests make wonderful shelter for feral cat colonies) BLANKETS, BED SHEETS, TOWELS. A full list of Fairfield County Rescue groups is on our site! They will welcome your donations and $$$$’s.

May the holiday season bring only happiness and joy to you and your family & furry friends!

Judy James

News, Tips & Happy Endings

Did You Know?

Check Under Your Hood For Your Cat on Cold Days: Many outdoor cats seek out the warmth of a car engine and this can lead to tragic consequences. Make it a habit to BANG ON THE HOOD OF YOUR CAR before starting the engine, both if you park your car outdoors or if you have cats taking shelter in your garage!

Think Lost, Not Stray: While some missing pets were "dumped" or left to their own devices, most recovered dogs and cats are LOST, not strays. Source

Displaced Cat Behavior: When an indoor-only cat escapes outside (or when any cat is displaced into an unfamiliar area), the cat is likely hiding in fear. But don't expect them to meow. A frightened cat will hide in silence. Source

Majority of Households Have Pets: About 60 percent of all households in the United States have a pet. (Source: American Veterinary Medical Association) About 60 million dogs and about 75 million cats are owned in the United States. (Source: Pet Food Institute)

Beware of Human Medication: For several years, human medications have been number one on the ASPCA’s list of common hazards for pets. In 2008, the ASPCA managed more than 50,000 calls involving prescription and over-the-counter drugs. Source

Prepare For Emergencies: The aftermath of Hurricane Katrina reminds us all of the importance of disaster preparedness. The ASPCA has a number of helpful tips on how to prepare your pet for an emergency.

Go Searching in Person: If you lose a pet, it is imperative that you be proactive in your search. Go to all local shelters and government agencies charged with picking up stray and lost animals and look for yourself, at least every other day. Source

Consider Pet Microchip ID: Significantly improve your chances of finding your lost pet and prevent accidental euthanization by purchasing a Microchip ID. Source